Dr. Bepis and A E S T H E T I C

I met Dr. Bepis when me and my friend Victoria visited California. We had just turned 18 and I had never felt that independent before. We met Dr. Bepis somewhere outside of SDCC and a couple of days later we all went to the beach, accompanied by Bepis’ guitar. Part of vaporwave explores nostalgia and having those memories of Dr. Bepis and my first time going that far from home adds another layer of that for me. His current sound is something totally new to me and possibly to you too.
Dr Bepis
Before I listened to your most recent music, I had never heard of vaporwave. Can you tell me a little bit about it?
Vaporwave originated in the late 2010’s and is essentially a love letter to the 80’s and 90’s as a whole. The genre takes 80’s/90’s music and slows it down, chopping it up and remixing it into something that sounds familiar, yet distant. Comforting, yet strange. Eerie, yet calm and beautiful. We try to invoke feelings of nostalgia, sadness, and depression with both not only the music, but the art as well, which is chopped and screwed retelling of old 80’s and 90’s art. I think James Ferraro sums it up the best, “Listen to Claude Debussy, and secondly, go into a frozen yogurt shop. Afterwards, go into an Apple store and just fool around, hang out in there. Afterwards, go to Starbucks and get a gift card. They have a book there on the history of Starbucks—buy this book and go home”.
….
….
When we first met I remember you playing the acoustic guitar. How did you get involved in the totally different sound of vaporwave?
I stumbled into vaporwave by complete accident. I honestly don’t remember how, but one day I never heard of this genre in my life, and the next I’m 12 songs in and wondering where this genre has been my entire life. I think I mostly gravitated to Vaporwave because of it’s association to the LoFi Hip Hop scene, which I had started to become a more active member of. I think what dragged me in was the entire A E S T H E T I C of it, the genre is not shy of bringing up and addressing feelings of sadness and depression, and I think that’s a good thing. As I was going through a depressive phase at the time, vaporwave attracted me by showing that it’s totally ok to feel sad sometimes. That you can’t, and shouldn’t, just let your depression dominate you and your life. Vaporwave became my way to live with depression and creating music became my therapy. It’s ok to cry and the sound definitely generates those feelings inside me. I guess getting involved is me trying to create sounds that can help the next sadboi who wanders into the vaporwave scene.
….
….
How long have you been creating music? 
….
I’ve been making music for about 5 or 6 years now, and vaporwave specifically I’ve been making for 2 years now. Good times, good crimes.
….
Dr Bepis 2
….
You have a couple of projects you’re working on at the moment. How’s that going? What are you working on? 
 ….
Work is going rather groovy, I got a few different albums coming up from all the different work I do. I got a Demo for my band, I got a new Vaporwave album coming up, and I got a mixtape for my hiphop shit coming up as well. It’s tough pulling it all off, but music is something I enjoy, and I firmly believe that putting yourself under a bit of pressure when you make art gives you a result that is a real reflection of you as an artist.
….
 ….
What’s it like making a compilation mix with different artists? 
 ….
Working on compilation mixes is a very different experience than making your own solo work. Not only do you have to take in account the sounds and music that you produce, but the sounds and music made by everyone else involved on the tape. Ironically, that’s also the best part, cause you always get to hear new sounds by new artists and seeing where they take the music and the art is always interesting and fascinating to see. It’s always close to yours, but similar. Wacky shit.
….
….
Your album art is gorgeous and works really nicely with your sound. What was the process behind it? Who designed it? 
 ….
All the art for my music is mostly designed by me, with the occasional collab with my fellow vaporwave artists. I try to design the art to match the same sort of aesthetic and feeling that the music generates. Much like the music, I try to take old, 80’s and 90’s images and distort and destroy them to a point where they are recognizable, but also strange and alien. Soft colors, weird 80’s shit, I dig it.
….
Dr bepis 3
Who is exciting you in the music world right now?
….
 Honestly it’s been Joji. Watching his transition from the Filthy Frank persona to Joji has been very interesting, and his tracks are easily some of my fav new lofi jams. Joji has this beat style that creates some really really pleasant, melancholic beats, and his vocals match perfectly. I guess you could call it A E S T H E T I C.
….
….
Who are you listening to at the moment? 
 …
At the moment I’ve been listening to a lot of different older vaporwave albums to get inspiration for my new album. Cosmic Cycler has been my recent go to jam, 1-900-WEATHER is such a trippy good vibe. Check it out if you got the time. Good shit.
….
To support Dr. Bepis, you can buy his albums on Bandcamp, listen to his music on SoundCloud and check out his music videos on his YouTube Channel.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s